Introducing Papa “Board Game” Bear

We play board games regularly, and yet my last board game post was an embarrassing year and a half ago. Since there are just so many games I would like to share with you, I’ve enlisted my husband to help me get back on track.

He’s what you might call a “board game enthusiast,” to say the least. “Board game obsessed” may still be an understatement, because Papa Bear lives and breathes board games. As a regular visitor on BoardGameGeek (BGG), he’s a wealth of board game knowledge. He’s plugged in to the global board game community, too, and is the reason we were invited to play games at a stranger’s house in the Netherlands earlier this year. He’s the best. (More on the Netherlands eventually, I promise.)

Needless to say, he was agog at the idea of doing a guest post when I asked him to review The Gallerist, one of our favorite games. Well, “agog” is a stretch seeing as how his outwardly emotional range is that of your stereotypical engineer, but if nothing else, his eyes shone with some semblance of excitement. His gleeful, one-day turnaround was indication enough that I needed his help. Before I publish said post, however, I want to take a minute to properly introduce him in all his board game glory.

Papa Bear: The Board Game Extraordinaire

Jason, because continuing to refer to him as “Papa Bear” feels borderline inappropriate, is worth blogging about for many reasons. After all, he’s an incredibly devoted father, husband, and friend. But his real passion–I say this mostly jokingly–is board gaming. I mentioned a long time ago that our journey into the strategy, or “designer,” board game world began around the time of our wedding more than seven years ago. The obsession grew slowly in those first years, until Jason discovered Power Grid in 2014. Seeking a rule clarification online, he stumbled upon BGG and has never looked back. Now, four years later, he’s an avid user and contributor on the site.

So much so that one the most highly esteemed board game designers quoted him about his own game.

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I kid you not, this is probably one of Jason’s proudest moments.

The board game poet

Board games also make Jason’s creativity flourish (as do family bracket challenges, but that’s a story for another time). A year or so ago, he sent me an email with the following board game limericks. Limericks! Just because!

Hanabi

In Hanabi, you can’t see your hand
Others can, and insinuate commands.
They point to a card with glee,
Say, “You have a three!”
Then you play it, there’s no mental demand.

Five Tribes

It’s got yellow meeples, green, red, and blue,
And white, and soon purple, too.
Some applaud the game’s makers;
They added the fakirs.
Gee, who would’ve thought slaves are taboo?

Power Grid

Supplying the most power’s the goal;
Pure strategy, no luck of the roll.
When a good plant is auctioned,
Best proceed with caution,
Lest you run out of money for coal.

Power Grid*

So many expansion maps to be used,
This game never fails to amuse.
But my group still can’t learn,
Is it phase, step, or turn?
Wait, what round are we on? I’m confused.

If you haven’t played the aforementioned games and don’t understand why these are so clever, just take my word for it. If you have, then you can look forward to more of this wit in future post(s). If I’m lucky, he’ll write posts about these games as well. (Hint hint, J.)

*He just really loves this game.

Our Game-Playing Dynamic in GIFs

By now, I’m sure Jason has unknowingly won you over and you’re just itching to read his Gallerist review. Before I let him loose, and because no post as of late would be complete without them, I must first share this series of GIFs to shed some light on what it’s like when we play games together. I promise it’ll make you like him even more, if me a little less.

See, my husband is generally happy to play any game at any time with anyone. He doesn’t want to do poorly and likes to see improvement in his strategy, of course, but he genuinely doesn’t seem to care whether he wins or loses. While I also feel this way when I play in a larger group of people, I’m sadly not always the best loser when it’s just the two of us. Miraculously, he continues to play with–and love–me despite this unfounded and one-sided competitive streak.

It’s kind of like this. Maybe you can relate?

Playing with our friends

When I win

I mean, who doesn’t like to win? [Source]

When I lose

Pretty much the same except with snack sweats and not professional basketball sweats: “Good game, good game. Pass the chips, please.” [Source]

Playing with each other

When I win

When I keep my winning streak going. (Sadly, there aren’t many games like this.) [Source]

When it’s a close call and I pretend I’m not surprised I came out ahead. [Source]

When we total the score and I can’t believe my eyes. [Source]

When I have a snowball’s chance of winning and end up pulling ahead by the skin of my teeth. [Source]

When I finally beat him at a game he always wins. (Even the hair looks the same.) [Source]

When I lose

When he wins a game for the millionth time and I’m not even that surprised. [Source]

When I lose that close game by a couple of victory points, especially if he scored a bunch of those points right at the end. [Source]

When he wins after he totally screws my strategy.[Source]

When I finally am slated to win but then he gets some obscure bonus at the end. [Source]

Obviously, I experience a whole range of emotions when we play games. None of this should surprise you at this point.

When he wins

When he’s happy with himself, but only allows a brief smirk so as not to flaunt his victory to his fragile wife. [Source]

When he loses

When he loses, is happy to have played the game, and congratulates me on my victory. (Side note: this is also how my husband looks in a tux. Me-ow.) [Source]

Really, if this doesn’t convince you how much of a stand-up guy he truly is, then I’m not sure anything will.

Without Further Ado

My next post will be Jason’s review of The Gallerist. I know you’re biting your nails with excitement, so stay tuned! My hope is that you like it–and Jason–as much as I do.

 

 

[Featured image source]

 

An Intro to Board Games

Both Papa Bear and I grew up playing board games. In fact, when asked if he liked growing up with three brothers, he says, “Yes, because we always had a perfect amount of people for games.” I’m sure he likes his brothers for other reasons too, but it’s hard to say.

As an only child, I prefer to think that I was just super creative when I wanted to play a game and couldn’t wrangle together anyone else. After all, playing by oneself is almost a surefire way to win.

iwin

I’m also going to lose, unfortunately.
[Source]

Though we grew up with games like Mastermind, Scrabble, Life, and Monopoly (So. Much. Monopoly.), our tastes have changed in recent years. It all started when a good friend gifted us with Dominion for our wedding.

dominion

More on this later.
[Source]

Any good game involves a certain level of strategy, but what Dominion introduced us to was a whole new world that took those strategies to the next level. (For what it’s worth, bad games involve strategy too, but the goal is usually to end the game as soon as possible. Here’s looking at you, Candyland.)

In this new world, games are more complex. When I asked my game group to describe what makes these games different, they said that, unlike Monopoly or Life, for example, these require “meaningful decisions.” Because there is much less left to chance (e.g., rolling a die or spinning a wheel), you are responsible for your outcomes. Each action must be carefully planned as it can greatly affect your and your opponent’s future strategies. In turn, each time you play is very different from the last.

Now, I don’t mean to sound snobbish. There is a time and a place for games like Monopoly and Life. To me, one of the greatest things about board games is that they encourage conversation and interaction. Nearly any game allows for fun interchange, even those where “fun interchange” may be better described as “contentious debate.” Plus, many of us grew up playing these games. Playing them later in life can be fun for purely nostalgic reasons. Furthermore, they are great for teaching both kids and adults how to play board games. They introduce turn order and help people learn how to read game rules, win and lose with grace (sometimes), and generally have fun playing games.

guess who

These faces strike a chord with my sentimental heart.
[Source]

Let me step back, though. Before we go too far down the board game path, let’s start with some basics.

start

[Source]

A Quick Board Game Primer

A board gamer’s best friend: BoardGameGeek

Simply put, BoardGameGeek is a database for board games and it pretty much contains anything you’d possibly want to know about any game. I like to use it to research games before we buy them, read forums for recommendations of what to buy next in any certain category, search for rule clarifications, and log my game plays. If you think that’s a lot, you should see how Papa Bear uses the site. He basically lives and breathes “BGG.”

Board game categories

BGG helpfully classifies games in a few ways: type, category, and mechanism. Here are BGG’s “types” of games:

While these categories and descriptions are generally helpful, and will earn you points if you use them correctly in the gaming community, it’s important to remember that some games span across categories. So if you think you only enjoy party games, you may be surprised to find out that some of your favorites are also considered to be thematic games. You may be a bigger board game geek than you thought!

meeple

This guy is so excited about games that he decided to dress up as a blue meeple at the beach!*
[Source]

Where to begin

Based on the above descriptions, you may be drawn to a particular kind of game. You’ve likely already played a party game in recent years. If you have any friends who like to play games, ask them to play. I’ve never met a board game fan who will turn down a game night. If you don’t know any game lovers, check out a local board game store. For me, it’s the Chicagoland Games: Dice Dojo on Broadway and Bryn Mawr.

Going to your local store is great for a few reasons: 1. Any purchase would help support a local business; 2. They usually have demo libraries full of games you can try before you buy (with no pressure to buy at all); and 3. They typically host open game nights. The Dojo, for example, hosts an open board game night each Wednesday. There, you can meet like-minded people and try your hand at a new game. You are most likely not the only person unfamiliar with the game, so the environment is very conducive to learning and asking questions.

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Open game night at the Dojo. You can see a sliver of the demo wall on the right. They have so many games to try.
[Source: Me, after participating in a great open game night at the Dojo]

Now, since I tend to like strategy games (and party games) best, and since that’s kind of what I started off talking about here, I’d personally recommend starting with Dominion. Admittedly, I have no other frame of reference, but I think it’s a fun game that’s easy to learn and play in a relatively short amount of time. Another popular starting point for strategy games is Catan, formerly known as Settlers of Catan or “Settlers.”

Learning to play a new game

I’ll admit, when we first started playing Dominion, I found the eight-page rule book to be rather daunting. Now, I find eight-page rule books to be refreshingly short.

timeout

“Time out. I don’t want to read eight pages of rules. What else can I do?”
[Source]

There are several ways to learn how to play a new game. Over time I’ve realized that, in order of preference, I like to:

  1. Play with someone who already knows the game;
  2. Watch an overview video; and/or
  3. Read through the rule book.

Playing with people who know the game. Assuming your friends are somewhat articulate, it’s easiest to learn how to play a game from people who have already played it, especially if they’re played more than once. After a brief summary of components and rules, I often find that it’s easiest to just start playing and asking questions along the way. Sure, you may not be able to form a solid strategy yet, but there’s no better way to improve than by making mistakes. Plus, if you totally suck it up the first time, imagine how surprised they’ll be when you dominate the second time around.

Watching an overview video. Now, let’s say you know you’re going to play a game but you don’t own it and your friends aren’t with you yet. Save everyone the time and energy of having someone explain it by watching an overview video first. Good ones (like the Watch It Played series) will provide a succinct review of the basic game play and may even throw out a few ideas for strategy. The Dice Tower also has some nice videos.

Reading the rules. Finally, it never hurts to learn a game by simply reading the rules the designers took so long to write. In my experience, they become easier to understand the more games you play and rule books you read.

Regardless of how I initially learn a game, I find it to be very insightful to read through the rule book again after playing once. With a basic understanding of the game down, it’s easier to understand some of the intricacies of the rules. It’s also helpful because you realize what you did incorrectly the first time. Oops.

Ready to Play?

Enough talking about what kinds of games are out there and how to learn how to play them. It’s time for you to just start playing!

Have no friends? There are several solo games. Have a lot of friends? Grab a party game. Have just a medium amount of friends? You’re in luck, because there are a gazillion for two to four players.

Because I talked up Dominion a couple of times throughout this post, look for a follow-up that gives a little more detail about the game and why Papa Bear and I like it so much.

(Edit: Here’s the Dominion review.)

Again, the best part of playing games is the social element (although I do love a good mental challenge and some healthy competition). So while you (eagerly) wait to learn more about Dominion, feel free to ask questions or comment with your personal favorites.

go

Yes, I’m using a Monopoly board as the final image on a post where I kind of bash Monopoly. 
[Source]

*A meeple is a little wooden figure used in board games.